[Genealogy.net-users-en] German characters

Denyse,

You can also write these German characters by holding down Alt and hitting
right numbers on your key board:

Alt 132 ä

Alt 142 Ä

Alt 137 ë

Alt 148 ö

Alt 153 Ö

Alt 129 ü

Alt 154 Ü

Alt 225 ß

I do not find one with the double dots over the E. But this way you do not
have to copy and paste.

Audrey Coming in Placentia, California, U. S. A.

Hi Audrey,

You can also write these German characters by holding down Alt and hitting right numbers on your key board:
Alt 132 ä

[...]

Alt 225 ß
I do not find one with the double dots over the E. But this way you do not have to copy and paste.

thanks for your email. I used it to put your info to the list into the wiki-en!

http://wiki-en.genealogy.net/wiki/Help:German_characters

Regards,
Eric

Eric,
I tried the codes in the wiki help page,
I have to use alt 0203 to get Ë, alt 211 = ╙ on my keypad! Maybe these codes don't work for everybody. My computer is set for unicode characters. I guess some experimenting is in order.
Bill H.

I have found that the alt and number codes are very handy but you must use
the number pad not the numbers above the letter keys.

Hi all

[...]

Alt 225 ß I do not find one with the double dots over the E

In Germany we have no double dots over E. This is a french type.

regards

Lothar (Hlavensky)

Moin AUDREY8047@aol.com,

zur Mail vom Wed, 1 Mar 2006 14:56:52 EST:

I do not find one with the double dots over the E.

The � is not used in German, and the � is used very rare, only sometimes to
designate that the e is spoken separately from the preceeding vowel - e.g.
in so�ben.

I just translated my German GenWiki page on special characters into English
and included the umlauts - it is now under
http://wiki-en.genealogy.net/wiki/Help:Special_characters

Feel free to brush up my English as well as the names for the MS Windows
clicks after "<Start>" since I do not have an English Windows version.

Gru�
Gerd (Schmerse)

Hi all

In Germany we have no double dots over E. This is a french type.

first sentence: o.k., second sentence: not, as far as I know.

E with dots is used in Albany, e.g. the name of its capital is Prishtin�. And it is used in Dutch: the combination "ie" is normally pronounced like "ee" in English "feed", to force a spelling of "ee-e" where the last "e" stands for a short unstressed vowel; the two dots are used to force the separation.

Part of the "German" vowels are much more wide spread:
� and � are Turkish as well, "same" sound as in German
� is also Swedish, "same" sound as in German
� is used in Spanish to force a "u" to be pronounced separately in combinations "gue..." or "gui" and has nothing to do with the sound of the German �.

There may be a lot more languages in the world which make use of these double dots...

               Nikolaus (Ordemann)
       http://privat.genealogy.net/ordemann
       Die genealogische Ordemann-Homepage
The (German language) genealogical Ordemann homepage

Gerd,
Thanks for explaining the special characters. I took the liberty of altering your text a bit and found a def. for platzparend. As to the keystrokes after <start>, I'll let somebody else take a whack at that one.
Regards,
Bill(Hawk)

Moin Bill Hawk,

zur Mail vom Thu, 02 Mar 2006 12:08:15 -0500:

your text a bit and found a def. for platzsparend.

oh thanks - I wanted to look it up and then forgot...

Regards
Gerd (Schmerse)